Etta and otto and russell and james book review

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etta and otto and russell and james book review

ETTA AND OTTO AND RUSSELL AND JAMES by Emma Hooper | Kirkus Reviews

By clicking 'Sign Up' I acknowledge that I have read and agree to the privacy policy and terms of use. Free eBook available to NEW subscribers only. Offer expires in three months, unless otherwise indicated. See full terms and conditions and this month's choices. An editor once told me that all great stories are essentially one of two plots: someone goes on a journey or a stranger comes to town. Eighty-three-year-old Etta has never seen the ocean.
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Waist High, a song inspired by Emma Hooper's novel Etta and Otto and Russell and James

Etta and Otto and Russell and James book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. I've gone. I've never seen the water, so I'v.

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Thank you! When Otto Vogel was still a child, half-orphaned Russell joined the brood. The Great Depression burned on, crops failed, and schooling was casual. One of the teachers was Etta, no older than Otto and Russell. World War II came. Otto left. Russell, broken leg improperly mended, could not.

Otto has never lived alone. Etta sometimes has trouble remembering who she is. Which way has she gone? Turn east, and there are more than miles of Canada to contend with before you reach the Atlantic — but east is the direction in which Etta is travelling. How does Otto knows this? But the story is grounded firmly enough in the real world to maintain suspense as we wonder what will become of Etta — the scenes of her struggles with near-starvation in the wilderness are harrowing. There are moments when character development is undermined by the twists in reality.

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In Etta and Otto and Russell and James, Emma Hooper's intriguing debut novel, a woman in her early 80s rises early one morning on her farm.
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The Globe and Mail

In this debut fiction, year-old Etta Vogel sets off from the farmlands of Saskatchewan in search of the sea, leaving a note for her husband Otto and a pile of recipe cards. All this whimsicality suggests a more tricksy literary confection than the sound narrative framework of a Rachel Joyce. These initial suspicions are quickly confirmed. Etta traverses Canada in the company of a talking coyote she calls James. In the meantime, poor old Otto staves off loneliness at home by teaching himself to cook. We learn, very usefully, how to proof yeast and to make a sleeping poultice out of flax flowers. Otto was one of 15 children brought up on the farm.

The subject who is truly loyal to the Chief Magistrate will neither advise nor submit to arbitrary measures. Etta and Otto, the first two characters in the title of Emma Hooper's debut novel, are a childless, elderly couple from rural Saskatchewan. On page one, Otto wakes to find a note from Etta: "I've gone. I've never seen the water, so I've gone there. Don't worry, I've left you the truck.

This copy is for your personal non-commercial use only. Etta is an elderly woman slipping into the twilight of dementia who sets out on foot from her Saskatchewan farm on a pilgrimage east to the sea. She has her reasons, which become clear in the course of the narrative. James is a coyote who accompanies Etta on her trek, giving sensible advice about when to rest and how to find food. This setup might strike you as somewhat fanciful — a talking coyote? Nevertheless, the narrative is leavened with gentle humour and is ultimately uplifting. The Alberta-born Hooper, who has spent most of her adult life in England, is in her mid thirties.

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