Grover and the monster at the end of this book

8.48  ·  9,003 ratings  ·  689 reviews
grover and the monster at the end of this book

How a Book About Grover Revealed to Me the Wide World of Literature | Literary Hub

When you publish a novel, people want to know who your influences are, just as a low-level criminal is told to cough up the names of the masterminds who actually dreamed up the scheme that got him taken in. In my case, I have ready answers. So I have two big names to yield to interrogators. Or at least not telling the whole truth. On the next page, we discover that he has done what no fictional character should do—looked at his own cover, which makes him realize he is in this book and is therefore in trouble. All the reader has to do is anything other than keep reading, and Grover will be safe. Of course, the reader turns the next page.
File Name: grover and the monster at the end of this book.zip
Size: 83286 Kb
Published 10.01.2019

monster at the end of this book

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read.

The Monster at the End of this Book

For Teachers. For Parents. Maths Practice App. Get unlimited access to the 4 or 5-star teacher certified apps, lesson plans and user guides. Start your free trial now!

It was written by series writer and producer Jon Stone and illustrated by Michael Smollin, and originally published by Little Golden Books in It has since become the all-time best-selling Sesame Street book title and has been cited as a modern classic of children's literature. Having read the title page or, in later editions, the cover Grover is horrified to learn that there is a monster at the end of the book. He immediately begs the reader not to finish the book, so as to avoid meeting this dreadful scary monster. Growing increasingly fearful as the reader continues to turn pages and frustrated that they do not seem to realize the terrible danger, Grover resorts to constructing a series of ever-more-elaborate obstacles, such as tying pages together, nailing the page to the next one and finally even laying a brick wall to keep the reader from advancing further. However, nothing works primarily because from the reader's POV these are simple illustrations, not actual difficulties. Finally driven to total despair by the reader's ability to "overcome" the obstacles, Grover makes one last frantic plea to the reader not to turn the final page

It was written by Jon Stone and illustrated by Mike Smollin. In this book, Grover is horrified to learn that there is a monster at the end of the book and begs the reader not to finish it, so as to avoid the monster. He uses several methods to try and keep the reader from progressing, including tying the pages shut and cementing them together with bricks. After each page is turned, the results of the failed effort is shown, and Grover tries a new method to keep the reader from turning yet another page. To the amusement and relief of Grover, the monster at the end of the book turns out to be none other than himself, leaving the latter very embarrassed over what he had just went through. In its first year of publication, the book, which is one of the first to star Grover, sold two million copies. According to an internal Children's Television Workshop newsletter, "this figure, according to publishing sources, is an all-time one-year sales record for a single book.

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.
pioppi diet pdf free download

Teacher Certification

This is an animated storybook app, which will humorously help teach your child about emotions and early reading skills. The best-selling classic becomes an interactive storybook!

.

.

.

0 COMMENTS

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *